The Popularity of Video in Digital Asset Management

by

The third and final blog in the series on Video & DAM that comes from our friends over at Widen Enterprises, this one is written by their video expert Al Falaschi and looks at how video is becoming more popular in DAM systems, I hope you enjoy his view on this.

We would like to thank Widen Enterprises for allowing us to republish their content and please do checkout their content direct on the Widen Blog link that you will find on here.

Video & DAM

The growing popularity of video is well documented… There are a number of reports available. They explain the power and attractiveness of using video, specifically in the enterprise environment.
More than 65% of companies are using online video and that number is expected to continue increasing (VideoBloom, 2009). (Remember an earlier post, Gartner Predicts 25 Percent of Content in the Workforce to be Images, Audio or Video by 2013.) Online video is a key method of delivering and consuming information that educates, entertains, and/or inspires in ways that touch emotions static text on a page cannot achieve.

Director of research and design at Stanford University‘s Persuasive Technology Lab, Dr. BJ Fogg, writes that for a consumer to make a purchase, it requires a “behavior change.” Fogg’s behavior model talks about the convergence of three things that need to happen for the change to occur – a trigger, ability and a motivation. Motivation is strictly tied to “sensation.” Inherently, video combines the use of more human senses than most other traditional sales and marketing tools. Read more about the reason “why” video use is on the rise in business marketing.

How does that impact Digital Asset Management?
Video is a digital asset. As its popularity grows, enterprises will struggle to manage the creation, storage, and distribution of it. Video files are exponentially larger than text documents. Multiple copies of a file in multiple locations use even more storage. Version control is nearly impossible since someone has to remember each file’s location and update or renew it when a new one becomes available or when it expires. Plus, there isn’t always an easy way to search for the right video based on the content. Beyond that, an increase in video will also mean an increase in the amount of bandwidth required to serve the video – a requirement that many SMBs struggle with.

We can learn a lot just by looking at trends within Widen’s own organization and DAM software customer base. There are notable increases in not only the number of video assets being added to our DAM systems, but also in the rate of videos added per year. Due to the raw size of high resolution video, the percentage of the overall file size of our DAM taken up by video has grown extensively. Again, the rate of growth per year is also increasing as we choose to use video more and more for marketing, sales and customer service purposes.

From a sales and marketing standpoint, there are dramatic increases in the coverage of video as a topic in many of our sales calls, and in RFPs that we receive. There are a number of factors that are causing these increases. One is the growing popularity of video. Again, this is well documented. In addition, there is the entire social movement. For video, this requires organizations to not only produce video content, but to make it accessible and publish it to as many online video channels as possible.

An often unnoticed factor is the shift in video camcorder technology from “tape” to “tapeless.” Tape has been a crutch for video storage and backup for… well, for forever. With the new tapeless camcorders recording very high resolution files resulting in very large file sizes with no tape to put them on, suddenly, organizations are faced with storing, securing, backing up, and distributing files that are ten times the size of the files they are familiar with managing. And remember, it is GROWING!

Bottom line, the increasing demand for video will place demands on DAM software and digital asset hosting providers to make sure that video is handled seamlessly alongside all other assets.

Stats on video usage from VideoBloom’s VIEW Index (Video-Enabled Web Index):
100 Web Sites Surveyed

In August of 2009, the VIEW main index for the 100 surveyed companies was 30-75-25, which indicates that 30% of the companies had video on their home page, 75% had video on their site, and 25% didn’t use any video on their Web site.

  • 41% of the 100 surveyed companies have placed their Web videos 1 click away from the home page.
  • 25% of the surveyed companies have placed their Web videos deep into their Web sites, 3 clicks or more away from the home page.
  • 25% use online video in an advanced manner: contextual integration of videos, variety of video players, call-to-action tied to the video.
  • 32% offer a full-fledged “video center” comparable to a corporate TV channel.
  • 21% give access to such video center directly from their home page (one click away).
  • 12% display video ads for products on their site; 7% display video ads on their home page.
  • 36% offer full-screen video option.
  • 4% have video on auto-play (i.e. video starts as soon as the user lands on the page).
  • 11% open video in a new browser Web page.
  • 18% use a pop-up window to display video.
  • Video uses: 48% of the surveyed web sites use video for promotional purposes, 24% use it for informational purposes, 20% use it for demonstrative purposes, 6% use it to deliver news, 5% use it for entertainment purposes, 1% use it for other purposes and 0% use it for UGC (user generated content). (The percentages don’t add up to 75% because many sites use online video for several different purposes.)
  • Video formats: 61% use Flash video, 21% use Windows Media Player, 8% use QuickTime and 4% use Real Player. (The percentages don’t add up to 75% because some websites use more than one video format.)

Author: Al Falaschi Video Expert at Widen Enterprises (www.widen.com), a Madison,WI-based provider of digital asset management software and services.

Poster: Gary George

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 2.0 UK: England & Wales License.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

2 Responses to “The Popularity of Video in Digital Asset Management”

  1. Michael Josefowicz Says:

    Thank you for the post especially for those of us who watch DAM from the outside, with almost just enough knowledge to be dangerous.

    Another major driver that I didn’t see in the story is mobile phones. Over the weekend I saw that Google is going to launch their much rumored Google Branded unlocked Phone in Q1 2010. I think it’s a big deal because it might radically change the business model of the telco industry, much as iTunes did for music.

    Evidently, thousands? of them were put into the hands of google employees and the latest “story” is that they will hit the stores in January.

    The phones are unlocked. That means retail distribution without having to make any deals with any telco. By doing that, they will avoid the iphones/ATT problem.

    I think this means that the use of mobile video will scale much, much faster than we previously thought. I’ve long believed that the Internet is not best thought of as a mass medium. Rather it is telephone on steroids and frictionless commerce. In my mind the only two mass mediums are TV and Print.

    As you so carefully point out the DAM problems are enormous. My two cents is that puts the best server farms in the best positions. I don’t know enough to know, but it seems to me that means Google and Amazon in the lead. It also means an opportunity for elegant DAM solutions and mashups for pre-media folks who are well placed.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: