Posts Tagged ‘Creative Commons’

Cloud computing with a DAM

December 18, 2009

After Sean’s interesting little entry on whether more companies are going to move their application offering into the cloud, I had the pleasure of spending a lengthy amount of time Murray Oles of Chalex. They have taken a rather different approach to providing Digital Asset Management as a service and not as the key application driver. Workflow orchestration is their approach and storing assets is just a process that happens during our working day, and lets face it in our pre-media environments we are all about getting our jobs out and the assets are attached to our jobs, so this is a refreshing approach from a DAM vendor.

There are two things that make this system stand apart from the other; the first one which isn’tunique to what I have seen, but is unique in their implementation to it is the ability to build workflows to manage the process flow of your jobs, now this could be anything from the automation of tasks, to the people that need to review and approve something and right down to the assigning of tasks to people, studios or outsource partners. Now I said it wasn’t completely unique and that was because we have seen workflow in systems offered by Artesia and ADAM, but the workflow is all based around the assests and not the business processes.

The second thing that is pretty unique is that the system is offered completely in the cloud… yes completely – assets and all…. It all sits up there on the Amazon servers, this provides them with the ability to deploy an instance of the basic setup in a matter of hours, for more advanced configurations where the processes need to be mapped and custom panels need creating then these can be developed after the process has been worked out.

The system is using some great technology under the bonnet, such as Cozimo the collaborative, review and presentation system for online digital content in real-time, this is similar to other systems out there from Kodak, Dalim, and ProofHQ but also allows you to annotate video!

On top of these they are able to integrate additional services into the system such as:

  • Google integration –iGoogle “Gadgets” –Google Apps
  • Collaboration services
  • Video previews
  • FLASH previews
  • Web to print services
  • Promo planning
  • Adobe In Design Server engine
  • Translation services
  • On-line page building

Naturally there are the normal features such as published workflow models, resource groups, workflow teams and roles & permission setting along with a dashboard that allows you to keep track of your work assignments. They have also started developing smart forms based in Flex allowing for the information to be dynamically generated.

On top of all this they have an Adobe Air application that allows the users to connect and interact with the assets connected with a specific task. All for either an annual subscription fee or an outright price with annual maintenance fee that is very very competitive against other offerings on the market.

So with the prediction for 2010 being the year of the DAM Cloud Explosion, these guys are well positioned to get ahead of the race with a concept that doesn’t put the digital asset management as the key driver, but rather the business process is the heart of the solution.

We look forward to seeing how this system develops over the next 6 to 12 months as they find more integrators around the world to help them get a better saturation in the market.

My only closing comments would be that you shouldn’t judge a book by it’s cover, unfortunately their main website for the products http://www.pakzar.biz does need a bit of a marketeers touch.

Author: Gary George

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 2.0 UK: England & Wales License.

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Pre-media vs Pre-press

December 7, 2009

Righto, so the weekend is over, the sky is cloudy and the temperature is dropping here in the UK! So to start the week off, I can report that we had a mass of hits on the blog over the weekend and whilst noticing that our Pre-media on Wikipedia page had several hits I headed over to Wikipedia to see if anyone had contributed to the page…. To my amazement someone had! But they’d gone in and redirected the page to prepress…. PREPRESS!! Come on, that is so far from Pre-media now with companies all over the world redefining their service offerings to be more Pre-media based rather than prepress based. I mean let’s just break down the words for a start….

PRE a prefix occurring originally in loanwords from Latin, where it meant “before”

So PRESS would indicate the destination to be a printing press of sorts, or really any device that makes paper dirty.

And MEDIA would indicate any media channel available which could include print.

Media (communication), tools used to store and deliver information or data

As one of our Twitter followers put it, “Perhaps a bit too simplified but: Premedia is a bigger concept than Prepress since it concerns any output or media – not just print.” (thanks jgradvall)

Anyway, if my google alerts are anything to go by, more and more companies & individuals are taking an interest in Pre-media and converting themselves to provide a more diverse service-based offering. Just this weekend I received 5 alerts from companies all over the globe with ‘Pre-media’ in there somewhere…. Maybe any or all of those companies could join the discussions to open up and define what Pre-media means to the masses.

Author: Gary George

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 2.0 UK: England & Wales License.

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What is Pre-media? – You Must be Kidding….Part I

November 11, 2009

foot-soakBear with me OK, this blog does eventually get onto Pre-media and why people are asking what it is. Firstly though; what a time we had here at Tunicca last week! The first trade show for our company and now we have had time for our sore feet recover and  analyse our participation at mediaPro 09. Despite the number of trade shows I have done in the past the physical demands involved in standing on a stand for a predetermined number of days never fails to surprise me.  I am pleased to say that the sore feet, back, neck, etc. have now all subsided – and it was only a 2 day show this time, I must be getting old!

I must say that it seems an age ago since last Tuesday’s preparation and the very slight panic that we felt when we realised that we our graphics hadn’t arrived at the venue. At that point in time we had a shell scheme but no Tunicca messages or brand colours! Thankfully our printer rushed the banners to us in time (thanks Paddy) and we were up and running and ready for action.

I have to say that our overriding impression of mediaPro 09 was the incredible amount of people who asked what Pre-media is. What is even more amazing is that this was a show that held Pre-media as a core element of its focus. So why is it that so many, upon looking at our stand, asked us….“so what is Pre-media then?” Is the term really that new? I think not – just ask the  representative of RR Donnelleys who recently insisted that it has been around since 1995 (highly debatable, but I will let Gary tell you the reasons why we contest this).

wikipedia-logoAnyway that is a small point and the important issue here is that, despite its now widespread use, there seems to be either confusion or total ignorance surrounding this important area.  In Part II of ‘What is Pre-media? – You Must be Kidding…’ we expand on the definition that we recently posted on Wikipedia. ‘Pre-media’ is a term that used so frequently now across the industry and it is a widely accepted part of the media supply chain – so why is there so much uncertainty?

Whilst I am on the subject of Pre-media, here in the UK I must congratulate the efforts of the BPIF (British Printing Industries Federation) who have emraced this whole area by starting an offshoot called DotGain.org. The organisation has been created to assist the traditional UK print sector in satisfying the demand of creatives and marketeers in CPC’s, publishers and advertisers to exploit all of the new access channels that they have to consumers. This should be interesting to watch and, if they want us to, be involved in. The big question is whether it will breathe new life into printers’ pre-press departments across the country as they adapt and flex to meet new demands imposed by this new era – or will it be a missed opportunity? Either way Tunicca will be on hand to help!dotgain

AuthorSean Runchman

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Music 2.0 and beyond

July 30, 2009

The music industry is going through a transition from what they called Music 1.0 to the now named Music 2.0. This transition is well documented by authors such as Steve Knopper, Gerd Leonhard, Chris Anderson and many others who have charted the changes in the creation, the content and the distribution.

Creative MP3 Players

1gb MP3 Player

 

WinAmpMusic 2.0 has seen the raise of the internet changing the way the music industry has needed to approach the distribution, they once fought against the illegal distributors, people like Napster and shut them down for providing a distribution service to individual consumers, at the time no one in the music industry was providing an accessible way for the mass of connected consumers to access the content in a manner that was affordable, the consumers desire to hold the actual psychical copy declined as the WinAmp provided a way to listen on your PC and with the electronics industry providing a whirlwind of consumer devices to play the new digital content, content the consumers ripped and distributed themselves. Sites like MP3.com, Cductive and eMusic felt a groundswell of consumers looking to find the music content for free. But the labels wouldn’t sign deals to distribute music electronically, those that did like Sony tried to charge $3.50 per track that turned off the early adopters who were willing to pay, turning them to the ever increase sources for illegal content, and why not it was easy!

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