Posts Tagged ‘Wikipedia’

Pre-media vs Pre-press

December 7, 2009

Righto, so the weekend is over, the sky is cloudy and the temperature is dropping here in the UK! So to start the week off, I can report that we had a mass of hits on the blog over the weekend and whilst noticing that our Pre-media on Wikipedia page had several hits I headed over to Wikipedia to see if anyone had contributed to the page…. To my amazement someone had! But they’d gone in and redirected the page to prepress…. PREPRESS!! Come on, that is so far from Pre-media now with companies all over the world redefining their service offerings to be more Pre-media based rather than prepress based. I mean let’s just break down the words for a start….

PRE a prefix occurring originally in loanwords from Latin, where it meant “before”

So PRESS would indicate the destination to be a printing press of sorts, or really any device that makes paper dirty.

And MEDIA would indicate any media channel available which could include print.

Media (communication), tools used to store and deliver information or data

As one of our Twitter followers put it, “Perhaps a bit too simplified but: Premedia is a bigger concept than Prepress since it concerns any output or media – not just print.” (thanks jgradvall)

Anyway, if my google alerts are anything to go by, more and more companies & individuals are taking an interest in Pre-media and converting themselves to provide a more diverse service-based offering. Just this weekend I received 5 alerts from companies all over the globe with ‘Pre-media’ in there somewhere…. Maybe any or all of those companies could join the discussions to open up and define what Pre-media means to the masses.

Author: Gary George

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What is Pre-media? – You Must be Kidding….Part I

November 11, 2009

foot-soakBear with me OK, this blog does eventually get onto Pre-media and why people are asking what it is. Firstly though; what a time we had here at Tunicca last week! The first trade show for our company and now we have had time for our sore feet recover and  analyse our participation at mediaPro 09. Despite the number of trade shows I have done in the past the physical demands involved in standing on a stand for a predetermined number of days never fails to surprise me.  I am pleased to say that the sore feet, back, neck, etc. have now all subsided – and it was only a 2 day show this time, I must be getting old!

I must say that it seems an age ago since last Tuesday’s preparation and the very slight panic that we felt when we realised that we our graphics hadn’t arrived at the venue. At that point in time we had a shell scheme but no Tunicca messages or brand colours! Thankfully our printer rushed the banners to us in time (thanks Paddy) and we were up and running and ready for action.

I have to say that our overriding impression of mediaPro 09 was the incredible amount of people who asked what Pre-media is. What is even more amazing is that this was a show that held Pre-media as a core element of its focus. So why is it that so many, upon looking at our stand, asked us….“so what is Pre-media then?” Is the term really that new? I think not – just ask the  representative of RR Donnelleys who recently insisted that it has been around since 1995 (highly debatable, but I will let Gary tell you the reasons why we contest this).

wikipedia-logoAnyway that is a small point and the important issue here is that, despite its now widespread use, there seems to be either confusion or total ignorance surrounding this important area.  In Part II of ‘What is Pre-media? – You Must be Kidding…’ we expand on the definition that we recently posted on Wikipedia. ‘Pre-media’ is a term that used so frequently now across the industry and it is a widely accepted part of the media supply chain – so why is there so much uncertainty?

Whilst I am on the subject of Pre-media, here in the UK I must congratulate the efforts of the BPIF (British Printing Industries Federation) who have emraced this whole area by starting an offshoot called DotGain.org. The organisation has been created to assist the traditional UK print sector in satisfying the demand of creatives and marketeers in CPC’s, publishers and advertisers to exploit all of the new access channels that they have to consumers. This should be interesting to watch and, if they want us to, be involved in. The big question is whether it will breathe new life into printers’ pre-press departments across the country as they adapt and flex to meet new demands imposed by this new era – or will it be a missed opportunity? Either way Tunicca will be on hand to help!dotgain

AuthorSean Runchman

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Pre-media Arrives on Wikipedia

October 7, 2009

OK so we finally got around to adding an entry into Wikipedia for the term Pre-media; amazing that it wasn’t there in the first place since just about every other term relating to our industry is. Just goes to show how young it is!

Watching our Google Alerts increase for the term Pre-media, we realised that Pre-media had not been defined in the global key community reference website Wikipedia. So using our own definition we have entered a reference for this important industry term and we would be interested to see if anyone has anything to add to our description. Remember that Wikipedia is a site driven entirely by the online community and so you are free to log on to the site and adapt and add to our entry as you see fit.

We kind of feel that we have covered all bases for now. But, since Pre-media is still a relatively young word, maybe there is more to be added (?). Without a doubt the term will need to be adapted and changed as the world of Pre-media flexes and expands to embrace new media output channels. It will certainly be interesting to watch this happen.

So head on over to Wikipedia and see if you have anything to add, edit or reword. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Premedia

Author: Gary George

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